Mansions in Busby

This particular Busby House was completely remodelled by famous Glasgow architect Alexander Greek Thomson (1817 – 1875) in 1858 from an original building of 1796.

There were two mansion houses in Busby, confusingly both called Busby House.

Busby House (1)

This particular Busby House was completely remodelled by famous Glasgow architect Alexander Greek Thomson (1817 - 1875) in 1858 from an original building of 1796. Thomson designed a magnificent extension in honey coloured sandstone (possibly from the nearby Giffnock Quarries), linking the house to an existing 2-storey building at the rear. The most impressive features were the library with its full-length window, reminiscent of a small, circular temple and the ornamental plasterwork suggesting day in the dining room and night in the drawing room.

The house was possibly commissioned by the owners of the adjoining printfield, Inglis & Wakefield, or by the local landowner and benefactor, Durham Kippen.

Greek Thomson's Busby House was, sadly, demolished in 1969.

Busby House (2) (Dr. Moore's House)

The other Busby House was owned by James Crum, who at one time was owner of the Busby cotton mills. It later became Dr. Moore's Home for Convalescent Nurses and was demolished in the 1960s. It stood on the site of the present day River Court Flats.